HOME
ABOUT US
MISSION STATEMENT
DOBES AVAILABLE
ADOPTION PROCESS
& APPLICATION
OTHER WORTHY DOGS
DOBES ADOPTED
DOBE HEALTH
IN MEMORIAM
DOBE MERCHANDISE
SILENT AUCTIONS
RAFFLE
DONATE
DRT NEWS & EVENTS
LINKS & THINGS
ELIJAH'S FUND
DOBIE TAILS
TURN IN FORM
VOLUNTEER
CONTACT US
logo

All Available Dobes | Other Worthy Dogs

LEADER

LEADER
** Available For Adoption **
Gender: Male
Color: Black w/Rust
Age: 1 1/2 yrs.
WT: 85 lbs.
Ears: Natural
Tail: Docked
Altered: Neutered
Micro Chipped: Home Again
House Trained: Yes
Good with other female dogs.
Not good with cats.
Good with older children only.
This strikingly handsome, super-energetic Doberboy came to us from a loving home that just couldn’t keep up with him anymore. Don’t get me wrong; his former owners loved him and worked with him and took him to obedience training, and really did all they knew how in order to make what was no doubt a significant investment in money and time into the stable companion they had hoped for.

It's just that basically all Doberpups can try one's patience through the first couple of years as their raw talent and energy are trained and groomed into the amazing adults they become.  This fellow is no exception to that rule; in fact, he may be the poster boy for leading with unabashed enthusiasm over training (at least when he arrived at Elijah’s House).  At a year and a half, these dear folks had nearly made it.  Alas, he's with us now for placement in a new home that will complete the nearly-finished "break-in" period.

The good news is, that within his brief time with us, he already has calmed down significantly. Carol says, "Now he's relaxed and much easier to walk I can actually walk him on a slip lead without him taking me airborne!"  (Gotta laugh at that potential visual!) "And he loves playing with his Kong Frisbee toy."
 
A further word on the topic of his being energetic.  Leader came from a home where his owner took him for a long run early each morning.  Decades ago, I had one of the two top Dobers of my life.  He was a retired police dog, and he needed more than a daily walk.  We lived in town and had no large yard or field where he could run, so while he was still young and required a high level of activity, several times a week we took him to a rural dirt road where there was literally no traffic and let him lope along the side of the road next to the truck as I idled along for a couple of miles.  Leader has a similar level of energy at this point and will need a home with space for him to run, or perhaps with someone who jogs regularly so he can get the exercise needed.   Mind you, I am not recommending that you run a dog beside a motor vehicle or bicycle, either one!  This was more than forty years ago in rural, northern Vermont.  I would not do this today.
 

Volunteer comments:
   “Leader is a perfect name for this ball of energy! He wants to be out front, and you’ll need to be prepared to follow. That being said, Leader is an affectionate boy who loves to play. While I was weed eating around the field he was in, he kept following along as I worked outside the fence. The noise of the weed eater didn’t seem to bother him, and when I came inside the fenced area, he brought one of the Jolly Balls up to me and seemed to insist that I take a break and play with him. I’m a sucker for a happy-go-lucky boy wanting to play, and truth be told, the weed eater needed a break, too. I’d throw the ball and he’d bring it right back to me, drop it, and wait for my next toss. In between all this strenuous activity, he got a few ear rubs and I got a couple of gentle kisses.”

  "Leader is a great big love bug. He loves to play with his frisbee until he drops. Leader releases when commanded to. Loves to be petted, loved, and to have his neck rubbed.  He is a great dog, and even though young and energenic, can be very gentle.  I enjoyed my time with him."


 A few additional details: one of our volunteers observed that his jumping up is more of a soft jump rather than an “I-want-to-jump-all-over-you” thing.   To test this, Carol let him jump up on her (before telling him "Off"), and he was indeed rather gentle. She said “It seemed that he just wanted attention and a little hug and kiss. He's not obnoxious about the jumping as some Dobers can be.”  Also, when Carol spent a little time with him to see how he did on off-lead obedience heeling, he gave her full eye-contact attention, causing her to exclaim, "My Elijah did that!"  I can't tell you how big a deal that is, and I'm frankly surprised she's not keeping him for herself!


    “Wow! What a difference a few weeks makes!  I hadn’t had a chance to spend time with him recently, so when I went to DRT today, I told Carol I’d make a point to spend some time with Leader. The thing that I immediately noticed was how much better he walked on a leash.  When I walked him before, he was pulling me.  Today he was in front but walking with me at my pace, and I wasn’t having to hold back for all I was worth.  When I stopped for a second, he stopped, turned around, and gently (as much as a 95 pound Dobe can) placed his front paws on my shoulders and gave me several kisses.  If you can’t tell, I think this guy is pretty special!  We later played tug-o-war with a Jolly Ball.  I’d throw it as far as I could, and he’d chase after it and bring it back for me to play with him.  When I got tired, he would just look up at me and let me start rubbing his ears, and then he’d give me a few easy kisses in return.  Quite a boy!”
 
 
If you think you may have what it takes to follow this leader into adulthood; if you can be the corporal to this sergeant, guiding from behind so he realizes his full potential, make an appointment to meet, observe, and interact with him. Note the signs of excellence that stand out all over this fellow, and perchance take him home and help him become all he can be. I'm confident you'll both be victorious, if you do.



 






LEADER
May 30th

LEADER

LEADER

LEADER

LEADER

LEADER

LEADER

LEADER

LEADER

LEADER

LEADER

LEADER

LEADER

LEADER

LEADER

LEADER

LEADER

LEADER

LEADER

LEADER

LEADER

LEADER

Contact: Carol Fama   P. O. Box 13979   Greensboro, NC 27415-3979
Rescue Areas Covered, but not limited to GA, NC, SC, VA, WV
phone: 336.621.3453   e-mail: FamaDobes@aol.com   fax: 336.621.9206 (no cover sheet required)
© 1997 - 2021 Doberman Rescue of the Triad