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All Available Dobes | Other Worthy Dogs

LOHR

LOHR
NOT Available For Adoption
Gender: Male
Color: Black w/Rust
Age: 3 1/2 yrs.
WT: 70 lbs.
Ears: Cropped
Tail: Docked
Altered: Neutered
Micro Chipped: Home Again
House Trained: Yes
Good with other dogs, but will lunge on leash when meeting.
Not good with cats.
Good with older children only.  Absolutely no young children.
This strikingly handsome Doberboy came to us from a family with a baby. Understandably, parents love their dogs but love their babies more. And sometimes when they have the baby, they begin to look at the dog differently for any one of several reasons.  In this instance, the baby startled the sleeping dog and he snapped at the baby - a normal enough reaction but one the parents couldn’t risk repeating.  

Many years ago, as a junior-high teacher, I took my retired police Doberman with me to class every day.  (Different times.)  He absolutely loved the kids, was very protective of them (I had to keep the classroom door locked to prevent surprise visitors from being surprised!), and they played and romped together when class wasn't in session.  

One day, we were sitting around the lunch table and he was standing with his head just underneath the edge of the table.  One of the girls got to laughing so hard she leaned back, lifting the table a few inches with her knees in the process.  As the table lifted, the dog’s head rose, and when she sat forward suddenly, the table banged him on the head.  Being "struck" on the head, he instinctively snapped at the nearest person - the school board chairman’s son, as it happened.  Thankfully no real harm was done - an abrasion on the leg through his pants, as I recall - but after the father assured me there would be no trouble about it, he suggested I not bring the dog to school anymore.  I agreed.  This is that type of situation.

The simple truth is, some otherwise excellent dogs can be uneasy around small children, and this handsome and good-dispositioned fellow’s parents were concerned enough about his uneasiness and instinctive reaction in this instance, that they thought it best to surrender him for placement in a home without small/young children.

That having been said, he’s clearly an exceptional Dober, as testified to by his owner, who wrote this:
    “Lohr exhibits strong but typical Doberman traits. He is high energy, intelligent, loving, and loyal. He is well-behaved when he knows boundaries but will try to lead the pack if he senses there isn’t a leader. He needs plenty of physical and mental exercise, but he is not destructive (biting walls, furniture, etc).

    He loves Kongs with peanut butter (we give him one nightly at bed time), chasing any ball or his owner, sprinting, and mind games where he has to find/work for food.

    He does not resist being handled/manipulated (baths, groomer, vet) and has never been allowed on the furniture. He will put himself to bed if he recognizes a bedtime routine (getting his PB filled Kong out of the freezer for example). We make him sit and wait before eating, going outside, getting a treat, etc. He’s a great Doberman and eager to please when given boundaries and physical/mental stimulation.”


Volunteer comment:
    “What a handsome, regal fellow!  He’s very athletic and loves to fetch the jolly ball.  I believe he’d chase after this ball for hours.  Each time he’d run after it, he’d bring it right back and let me have it just so I’d throw it for him.  If I’d had more time I would have seen which one of us gave out first (no chance it would have been him).  He also seemed to walk well on a leash.  It was a short walk, but he never pulled.  He’s going to make someone a very happy Dobe owner.”

As you can see, this is an outstanding Doberman within an outstanding breed. You’d have to look a long time to find as remarkable an example. If you are an experienced Doberman owner and have no young children, make an appointment to meet him after your application is approved. You won’t be going home alone.


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Oct 7th

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Contact: Carol Fama   P. O. Box 13979   Greensboro, NC 27415-3979
Rescue Areas Covered, but not limited to GA, NC, SC, VA, WV
phone: 336.621.3453   e-mail: FamaDobes@aol.com   fax: 336.621.9206 (no cover sheet required)
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